Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are at higher risk of some life-threatening diseases. So it is important for you to get your jab on time and keep them up to date even once you’re an adult. You might also need to have extra jabs on top of those recommended for each group.

Jabs (immunisation) at a glance

  • simple, safe, effective protection
  • help your body build antibodies to fight diseases
  • stop diseases spreading to others
  • reduce the severity of serious diseases

Jabs protect you, your family and your community. Getting immunised at the right time is the best way to help stay healthy.

There are a few jabs to get, so if you or your bub have missed some, you can always catch up.

For more info, check with your doctor or health provider or call 13 HEALTH (13 432 584).

Catch-ups

Having catch-up vaccinations means people can complete a course of age-appropriate vaccinations in the shortest but most effective timeframe. This provides optimal protection against disease as quickly as possible.

Vaccination Schedule

People with medically at-risk conditions may require additional vaccines. Talk to your doctor for more information.

Age Disease Comments
Birth Hepatitis B
  • For all children given within 24 hours of birth
  • Can be given up to 7 days after birth
Tuberculosis
  • Additional vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5 years and younger living in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
2 months (can be given from 6 weeks) DTPa-hepB-IPV-Hib (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis B, polio and haemophilus influenzae type B)
  • Given as one vaccine
Pneumococcal
Rotavirus
  • First dose must be given less than 15 weeks of age
  • Second dose at less than 25 weeks of age
Meningococcal B
  • Additional vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
4 months DTPa-hepB-IPV-Hib (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis B, polio and haemophilus influenzae type b)
  • Given as one vaccine
Pneumococcal
Rotavirus
  • First dose must be given less than 15 weeks of age
  • Second dose at less than 25 weeks of age
Meningococcal B
  • Additional vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
6 months DTPa-hepB-IPV-Hib (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis B, polio and haemophilus influenzae type b)
  • Given as one vaccine
Pneumococcal
  • Additional vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
From 6 months of age onwards Influenza
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should receive influenza vaccine annually.
  • For children, 2 doses required for children 6 months to less than 9 years of age with a minimum of 1 month in between doses in the first year they receive influenza vaccine.
12 months Measles-mumps-rubella
Meningococcal ACWY
Pneumococcal
Meningococcal B
  • Additional vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
18 months Measles-mumps-rubella-varicella
Haemophilus influenzae type b
DTPa (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough))
  • Given as one vaccine
Hepatitis A
  • Additional vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
4 years DPTPa-IPV (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio)
  • Given as one vaccine
Hepatitis A
  • Additional vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
Pneumococcal
  • Additional vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
  • Dose at 4 years of age with an additional dose at least 5 years later
Year 7 students (or age equivalent) Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
  • 2 doses given at 0 and 6 months
Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis
Influenza
  • All adolescents require one dose each year (this may incur a fee)
Year 10 students (or age equivalent) Meningococcal ACWY
  • 1 dose
Influenza
  • All adolescents require one dose each year (this may incur a fee)
19 to 49 years old Measles-mumps-rubella
  • All adults born during or since 1966 require 2 doses. Minimum interval between doses is 4 weeks
Influenza
  • All adults require one dose every year
Pregnant Women Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (whooping cough)
  • One dose recommended for each pregnancy
  • Administer between 20 – 32 weeks gestation
Influenza
  • Given at any stage of pregnancy
  • Influenza and Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis can be given at the same time
50 years old and older Pneumococcal
  • Additional vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults. Dependent on previous pneumococcal vaccinations. Dose of Prevenar 13 at ≥50 years of age with a dose of Pneumovax 23 2–12 months after that and then a second dose of Pneumovax 23 at least 5 years after the previous dose
Influenza
  • All adults require one dose every year
65 years and older Influenza
  • Free for all adults aged 65+
70 years and older Varicella zoster (shingles)
  • All adults require one dose
  • Catch-up available for ages 71 to 79 years (until the end of 2021)
Pneumococcal
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander vaccinations dependent on previous pneumococcal vaccinations
Influenza
  • Free for all adults aged 65+

* People with certain conditions have an increased risk of pneumococcal disease. They need extra doses of vaccines to optimise protection. For more information on pneumococcal vaccines, see your doctor or health provider.